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5G Virtualization
Depending on who you speak to, 5G is either humankind’s greatest imminent blessing or its greatest imminent curse. Still in its infancy, and not yet commercially standardized, this technology has already been the most polarizing advancement we have ever seen in communication. Consumers worldwide are captivated by promises of super-fast download speeds, split-second responsiveness and next-level mobile phone communication, but are divided on the possible sacrifices of privacy and security. Detractors continue to issue condemnations of 5G cellular’s possible health risks. Supporters continue to shake their heads in disbelief. Governments jostle for geopolitical supremacy; 5G is seen as both a proxy...
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In 1967, Lynn Margulis, a young biologist, published a paper that challenged more than a hundred years of evolutionary theory. It proposed that millions of years ago, the eukaryotes emerged not from competition, as neo-Darwinism asserts, but from collaboration. Margulis’ research showed how single-celled lifeforms working together created an entirely new organism that became the foundation of all advanced life on earth. This was an inflection point in the development of evolutionary biology, shifting the scientific and cultural narrative away from “survival of the fittest” towards “survival of the most cooperative.” Though competition contributes to better individual or organizational performance, it...
AI and 5G Double-edged Sword
If you've ever been to an expensive restaurant and ordered a familiar dish like, say, lasagna, but received a plate with five different elements arranged in a way that does not at all resemble what you know as lasagna, then you have probably tasted deconstructionism. This approach to cuisine aims to challenge the way our brain makes associations, to break existing patterns of interpretation and, in so doing, to release unrealized potential. If the different elements work together harmoniously, it should be the best lasagna you've ever tasted. So it is with 5G. In principle, the 5th Generation network is deconstructed. Firstly,...
5G Business
5G connectivity burst onto the world stage at last year’s Winter Olympics in Seoul, South Korea and gained pop culture visibility again at the April 2019 NCAA Final Four men’s college basketball games in Minneapolis. Why the rush to 5G though, when most of the world is still rolling out 4G mobile service or still waiting for it? Consumers don’t yet have 5G enabled phones anyway. And why should mobile phone manufacturers push new 5G phones out to market before there’s any connectivity across coverage areas large enough to justify replacing a smartphone? According to the Wall Street Journal,...
5G Cell Tower
Ultra high speed, high quality 5G networks are expected to provide the connectivity required for massive IoT adoption, remote robotic surgery as well as instant movie downloads and 3D mobile gaming. The technology boasts incredible reliability and low latency and promises to enable the next industrial revolution and society 5.0. Assuming that 5G policy and regulatory issues are sorted out. However, recent hype generated by mobile operators and false promises inevitably mean that unreasonable early expectations will go unmet. So far, China and Huawei have out-competed Americans in development and deployment of 5G technology. The Trump Administration is keenly aware...
5G Network Slicing
Hyped as the technology that will transform the world, 5G is moving past the buzzword stage with first implementations coming to life in 2019. Nations are racing to 5G with such fervor that it now became one of the hottest hot-button geopolitical issues. With latency as low as 1 ms and speeds of up to 4 Gbps, as well as a wider range of frequency bands and enhanced capacity, 5G will be able to accommodate innovative use cases and much greater numbers of connected devices, driving overall growth for Internet of Things (IoT). In addition to the speed and capacity improvements,...
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Telecom operators sat back as the new over-the-top (OTT) service providers, internet and tech companies slowly ate away at their business, particularly in the B2C space. A combination of institutional laziness and poor execution on promising initiatives gave these new entrants the time to jump in and snatch away customers. At the moment, the future doesn’t look too bright either with a worldwide CAGR put at 0.7 percent through to 2020. For the time being, wooing back B2C customers is a losing battle. While OTTs use telecom operators to deliver their services, these companies can’t muscle out the competition since...